Moviefraud header image 1

Ep. 35: Robin Hood / Mala Noche / Invictus / The Five Obstructions / Stop-Loss

May 23rd, 2010

robinhood1.jpg

In honor of Lars von Trier's The Five Obstructions -- discussed on this episode of pdxfilmcast -- Josh and Evan agreed on five challenges to make this episode more difficult: 1) They had to discuss a new release neither of them wanted to see, 2) they had to choose a film from a female director that didn't deal with gender or sexuality, 3) they had to watch additional films by Gus Van Sant and Clint Eastwood, 4) there could be no note-taking on Evan's part, and 5) they had to do it all in one take. The result? Ridley Scott's Robin Hood, a "Directrospective" exploring Mala Noche, Invictus and The Five Obstructions, and a continuation of the Women Directors Fest with Kimberly Pierce's 2008 war drama Stop-Loss. Find out if they succeeded -- or had Mr. von Trier smirking in disapproval.

Music: Karl Blau - "Dark Sedan" / Herbert - "The Movers and the Shakers"

00:0000:00

Ep. 34: A Nightmare on Elm Street / Our Top 5 Remakes / The Piano / EaC – Lars von Trier

May 8th, 2010

LarsvonTrierwithCast.jpg

Does Samuel Bayer's rendition of Nightmare on Elm Street earn a place on either Evan or Josh's list of Top Five Remakes? What does the mute protagonist of Jane Campion's The Piano have to say for herself? How can the creators of Lars von Trier's Antichrist -- pictured above -- look so happy after making that film? And just how far can Josh stretch the definition of "film"? Find out in this episode of pdxfilmcast as we continue our Women Directors Fest and wrap up our Lars von Trier Import with a round of "Everyone's a Critic".

Music: Tom Petty, "Big Weekend" / R.E.M., "I Took Your Name"

Show notes:

  • Review of Dancer in the Dark by Stephanie Zacharek for Salon.com
  • Review of Dogville by The New Yorker's David Denby
  • Review of Antichrist by The Onion AV Club's Noel Murray
  • Interview w/ von Trier by Henrik Saltzstein for Vice Magazine
  • Another interview w/ von Trier, courtesy of AbsoluteNow.com
  • And, finally, a correction: Wes Craven's The Hills Have Eyes premiered in 1977, not 1978.
00:0000:00